Business Section

Ethiopia Opens Telecoms for Sale

Mobile problems: Ethiopia's phone system is struggling to cope with demand EDUARDO SOTERAS AFP

AFP

Ethiopia Unlocks One of the World’s Last Closed Telecoms Markets

Addis Ababa (AFP) — For delivery man Sisay Alebachew, the difference between a good and bad day depends on Ethio Telecom, Ethiopia’s monopoly telecoms provider.

When the internet is down or too slow to use, customers struggle to place orders on the website of Deliver Addis, Sisay’s e-commerce employer, meaning he has little to do.

Other times, when the phone network is jammed, Sisay can’t reach customers to complete deliveries — he wastes precious time standing outside their homes, dialling in vain.

Sisay is thrilled, then, that after years of build-up, change finally seems to be coming to Ethiopia’s stunted telecoms sector, one of the last closed markets in the world.

Last week the government regulator invited firms to submit “expressions of interest” for two new telecoms licences that would break up Ethio Telecom’s monopoly.

Officials also plan to sell a 40-percent stake in Ethio Telecom, a move they hope will make the firm more efficient.

“For a business like ours, telecoms is crucial, and it’s the most difficult challenge we face,” Sisay told AFP during a break from his rounds one recent afternoon.

“I’ve heard that many countries have a better connection compared to us. I’m hoping ours will improve when other companies join the market.”

The shake-up of the telecoms sector is a cornerstone of Prime Minister Abiy Ahmed’s economic reform agenda, although there are several big unknowns.

These include how much money outside firms will need to fork up to enter the market and what, exactly, the revamped sector will look like.

Nevertheless it’s “an exciting time”, said Deliver Addis founder Feleg Tsegaye.

“I think everyone in the tech scene has at one point or another been wondering, ‘When is this going to happen?’”

- ‘New growth area’ -

The Ethiopian Communications Authority, the regulator, has given firms until June 22 to submit expressions of interest for licences.

Potential bidders include France’s Orange, Kenya’s Safaricom and South Africa’s MTN.

The value of licences could well exceed $1 billion each, and firms will also need to finance improvements to telecoms infrastructure held back by years of underinvestment.

Analysts point out that many firms see the cost as a bargain, given Ethiopia’s population of 110 million — plus the fact that Ethio Telecom currently has only around 44 million subscribers.

“Ethiopia obviously represents this new growth area, and any operator would want to get in on the ground floor,” said Chiti Mbizule, analyst at Fitch Solutions.

“But despite the significant potential that we maintain Ethiopia has, for any player entering this market, it’s not going to be cheap.”

- Mobile money, shutdowns -

There are some concerns that outside firms’ operations will be limited.

A central bank directive issued last month allows non-financial firms to provide mobile financial services, but only if they’re locally owned.

That could be a problem for companies like Safaricom and Orange which place mobile money at the centre of their business models.

Additionally, Ethiopia has developed a reputation for extended internet shutdowns during periods of social unrest and more innocuous events like national exams.

One of the most important things going forward will be for the government to assure outside firms they’ll be operating on a “level playing field” with Ethio Telecom, said Zemedeneh Negatu, chairman of the US-based Fairfax Africa Fund.

“It’s the biggest untapped market left in the world, so all the serious players are pretty excited about the Ethiopian market,” Zemedeneh said.

“But on the Ethiopian side, we have to make sure to monetise that.”

- ‘No mandate’? -

Perhaps inevitably, the telecoms reforms face political headwinds as Ethiopia gears up for national elections that, before the coronavirus pandemic, were planned for August.

Some critics accuse Abiy, who was appointed prime minister in 2018, of overstepping his mandate by selling off part of Ethio Telecom, a profitable state-owned firm.

“If you were elected democratically on the agenda that you’re going to be selling strategic assets, then you don’t have to wait for elections,” said Alemayehu Geda, an economist at Addis Ababa University. “But this government didn’t come via an election with an agenda of selling.”

The worst outcome would be if the government were to simply “cash in” on reforms without guaranteeing service gets better, said German Ambassador Brita Wagener, though she stressed that so far officials seem committed to doing “a thorough job”.

“The IT sector needs a lot of improvement in the country. The internet has a lot of problems,” Wagener said. “We see that particularly now with all the virtual meetings we are having.”

Abiy’s team, for its part, seems determined to push forward with telecoms reforms even amid a state of emergency prompted by the coronavirus pandemic.

That’s welcome news at Galani Coffee, an upscale cafe in Addis Ababa where customers routinely park themselves for hours to work on their laptops.

“Whenever there is an internet outage they get frustrated,” cafe supervisor Meheret Eyob told AFP before closing one recent evening, as the last tables settled their bills.

“Most of them complain, and some of them don’t ever come here again because of this.”


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Ethiopia Businesses Get Virus Tax Relief

Cleaning staff disinfect a metro carriage as a measure against the spreading of the coronavirus in Addis Ababa, on March 20. (Photographer: Michael Tewelde/AFP via Getty Images)

Bloomberg

By Samuel Gebre

Updated: May 2nd, 2020

Ethiopia Offers Tax Relief for Companies Hurt by Virus Fallout

Ethiopia offered tax relief to companies affected by the fallout from the coronavirus, state television reported, citing the finance minister.

Interest payment and penalties on outstanding taxes due between 2015 and 2018 will be canceled outright and the underlying tax due can be paid in installments, the Ethiopian Broadcasting Corporation reported, citing Eyob Tekalign, the State Minister of Finance. Firms affected by the Covid-19 will also get relief for four-month of income tax.

The government will also grant a one-month grace period on payment of value-added and turnover tax payments. Firms that pay their tax in a lump sum will receive a 10% discount and there will be as much as 20% discount for companies donating to the Covid-19 response, EBC reported.


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COVID-19 & Its Impact on Africa: Q&A with Prof. Lemma Senbet

Prof. Lemma Senbet. (Photo: @AERCAFRICA/Twitter)

Tadias Magazine

By Liben Eabisa

Updated: May 1st, 2020

New York (TADIAS) — Last week Professor Lemma Senbet, an Ethiopian-American financial economist and the William E. Mayer Chair Professor at University of Maryland, moderated a timely webinar titled ‘COVID-19 and African Economies: Global Implications and Actions.’ The well-attended online conference — hosted by the Center for Financial Policy at University of Maryland Robert H. Smith School of Business on Friday, April 24th — featured guest speakers from the International Monetary Fund (IMF) as well as the World Bank who addressed “the global implications of the COVID-19 economic impact on developing and low-income countries, with Africa as an anchor.”

In the following Q&A with Tadias Prof. Lemma, who is also the immediate former Executive Director of the African Economic Research Consortium based in Nairobi, Kenya, explains the worldwide economic fallout of the Coronavirus pandemic and its impact on the African continent, including Ethiopia.

TADIAS: Prof Lemma, thank you for your time.  You just finished moderating a webinar on COVID-19 & African Economies. Can you give us a  quick recap of the online conference?

Professor Lemma W. Senbet: The webinar featured two high level policy experts and officials from two of our flagship international institutions: Dr Domenico Fanizza who is a member of the IMF Executive Board, and Dr Rabah Arezki, World Bank MENA Chief Economist.

Let me first give you a context for the webinar. We often hear about the dark side of Africa in international news media. Yes, Africa has its dark side. African countries face enormous economic and social challenges, but on the bright side, Africa has maintained sustained growth over the last 25 years, with some seven countries having been among the fastest growing in the world. This is not accidental. It is an outcome of years of massive reforms of both real and financial economies in Africa.

Now enter Africa and COVID-19, the greatest global crisis of the century. This is foremost health crisis of epic proportions. It has like-wise resulted in economic crisis of epic proportions, far exceeding the global financial crisis (a decade ago) and touching every country and, in fact, every human being. The webinar focused on the economic dimensions facing low income countries, with a focus on Africa.

After a slow start in Africa, COVID-19 has been spreading rapidly throughout the continent. The adverse economic consequences are already being felt. This is in part due to negative economic spillovers resulting from the economic hits to Africa’s main trading partners: EU, China, U.S.

The resource rich countries, particularly Nigeria, Angola, South Africa, South Sudan, etc., have been badly hit.. Moreover, similar to the other countries, such as U.S., African countries have begun implementing mitigation and containment mechanisms to cope with COVID-19.

Therefore, large portions of African economies are shut down to prevent mobility and spread of the virus. Major cities in this regard include Lagos, Johannesburg, Harare, Accra, and Addis, Nairobi.

TADIAS: What specific issues were discussed at the webinar?

Prof Lemma: The webinar was intended to unpack the key economic issues, and for the earlier part, it dealt with global interconnectedness which, and in this context as to why Africa and low income countries matter to the rest of the globe. Hearing this from speakers who are highly placed at the global institutions and reassurance for global partnership was welcome. The webinar provided a broad assessment of economic devastation on low income countries, particularly African countries, for lockdowns, shutdowns, etc. – responses which are now widely adopted globally, including Africa.

While the advanced countries have the capacity to mitigate the adverse economic impact on livelihoods, small businesses, services, through massive government rescue programs, low income countries have no commensurate resources. The webinar discussed national and global responses to the plight of African economies; particularly the respective responses to-date of key global and regionals institutions: IMF, World Bank, UNDP, AfDB, etc.

The other issue the webinar addressed was exit strategy. The more advanced countries are easing restrictions to reopen their economies. However, low income and fragile states cannot afford to do that in view of low capacity for large-scale testing, weak health infrastructure, and relative absence of social safety nets. Even more disturbingly, economies would be further devastated with continuing lockdowns and shut downs. The speakers grappled with the health and economic consequences of relaxing restrictions, and if there is a way out or exit strategies for African countries.

The second part of the webinar was interactive based on the questions and commentaries from the participants. It was a global audience.

TADIAS: The International Monetary Fund (IMF) has stated that “the coronavirus pandemic is causing the worst economic downturn since the Great Depression of the 1930s” and that “the global economy will shrink by 3 percent this year.” What does that mean for Africa?

Prof Lemma: As Domenico Fanizza, member of the IMF Executive Board, mentioned, the IMF expects the GDP for Sub-Saharan Africa to contract by 1.6 percent in 2020. This is only at a gross level without accounting for population size. The per capita income is expected to decline by 4%. This is very disappointing to say the least. This hugely negative news has come after about two decades of sustained economic growth in the region, with several countries having been among the fastest growing in the world (Ethiopia included). There have been substantial improvements in living conditions and reduction in poverty. All that is now threatened. We hope the recovery to be fast post COVID-19, but it would be very difficult to recapture what is lost even we experience a V-shaped growth. Some are actually bracing for the W shaped growth, which is really scary.

TADIAS: Given the forecast that over the next two years worldwide output will be $9 trillion less than expected before the crisis, does the financial impact of the pandemic differ from region to region within the continent? And, if so, how?

Prof Lemma: Yes. Europe has been hit the most, with an expected 7.5 per cent reduction of GDP in 2020, as also mentioned by our panelist from the IMF. COVID-19 broke out when the region’s growth had already slowed down; countries, such as Italy, France, Spain, and UK are very likely to be hugely affected. The US  economic contraction is expected to be close to 5 percent, but already the number of unemployment filings has reached about 26.5 million (on April 24, the date of the webinar), and it is still rising. This is devastating viewed from the baseline (pre-COVID-19) full employment only a month ago. Asia is the only continent that is expected to grow (1 percent in 2020), but more slowly than expected a few months ago. The relatively lower economic hit is attributable to an early and prompt actions against the spread of the virus.

There are also substantial variations within Africa. COVID-19 showed up in the wake of the other headwinds the region is already experiencing – globally: China-US trade tensions and Brexit; internally, the challenges include weak health infrastructure; non-existent safety nets in most of these countries; commodity/oil price slump; and heavy indebtedness in terms of very high levels of debt (scaled by GDP) and high debt servicing costs. This is really very bad news for the oil-rich countries, such as Nigeria, Angola, South Africa, South Sudan, etc.

TADIAS: What’s the expected effect of the pandemic on economic activity in Ethiopia?

Prof Lemma: Ethiopia is not immune, of course. The impact will be major. Based on the IMF estimates, growth is expected to slow down dramatically from 9 percent to 3 percent in 2020. Ethiopia was among those countries which were immediately and adversely impacted by COVID-19 even at the inception of the spread of the virus. This resulted from negative spillovers from the main trading partners in EU, Middle East, China, and even US. The hospitality industry, including hotels, tourism, travel, were immediately affected. So was trade volume – both exports and imports. So were remittances. Moreover, the fiscal deficit will be greatly exacerbated in view of government expenditures in coping with the health crisis as well as rescue attempts to protect economic livelihoods and micro enterprises, as well as small and medium enterprises. These have been engines of employment creation, and should be protected. The large informal economy poses both risk of health epidemics and loss of incomes (already at very low levels) threatening those at the low end to devolve into poverty. That is why any government interventions, including global support for Ethiopia, should be multilayer, including the protection of the most vulnerable, as well as microenterprises and SMEs. The other side of the coin is that there are microfinance institutions which fund small businesses, and they should also be brought into the picture for government responses. They will fail if there is widespread default at the level of small businesses, particularly microenterprises. The Friday webinar was, in part, intended for enhancement of global attention to the plight of African economies and to the global responses for the mutual benefit – global health and economic health.

TADIAS: Last month both The World Bank and IMF issued a joint statement to the G20 concerning debt relief for developing countries and calling “to suspend debt payments from IDA countries that request forbearance.” What are your thoughts on this proposal? Does it go far enough to address the looming debt crisis?

Prof Lemma: Many African countries were already on the verge of looming debt crisis due to build-up of high levels of borrowing domestically and internationally. I cannot see much worse time for these countries to get caught up with the COVID-19 crisis. The international initiatives coming from G20 and international financial institutions are definitely welcome, This should be viewed in the broader global interest and interconnectedness which are now reinforced by COVID-19. In this connection, what is not getting as much attention is debt owed to private international creditors. The good news is that many African countries began accessing international credit markets (e.g., Eurobonds issuance) at arms length. In the earlier HIPC era, these countries were rationed out of the markets. Now they are also able to access diverse sources of borrowing. However, this has become a double-edged sword, particularly in troubled times, such as the one we are facing. It would be very difficult to restructure agreements among diverse set of creditors. While non-private creditors are engaged in debt restructuring and reliefs (at least in the short term by rescheduling payments, etc), I have not witnessed yet that such initiatives are taking place with respect to private creditors. There should be a concerted global effort to bring them to the table to resolve the looming debt crisis in an efficient and mutually beneficial manner. Without that I am worried that African countries, except the very few, such as South Africa, may get rationed out again in the future from the private credit markets.

TADIAS: Looking at the future, what are some of the main institutional changes and solutions that need to be implemented on the global level in order to avoid similar disasters from occurring again?

Prof Lemma: I will be brief here. I am taking a pro-globalization view. I would not be surprised, though, if anti-globalization forces emerge from COVID-19. My view is that, given a very strong reinforcement and reawakening by COVID-19 about global interconnectedness, policies must be globally coordinated both at the health and economic levels. COVID-19 has not spared anyone. As they say, we are in it together!

TADIAS: Thank you again Prof Lemma and we wish you all the best. Stay safe and healthy.

Related:

Spotlight: Prof. Lemma Senbet Moderates Webinar on COVID-19 & African Economies

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‘Ethiopia is my Home’: Syrian Chefs Build New Lives Fuelled by Shawarma

Adna Mohammed moved to Ethiopia in 2013 and now owns a successful shawarma restaurant in Addis Ababa. (The National)

The National

Updated: April 20th, 2020

Ethiopia’s asylum policies have made the country a rare refuge for Syrians fleeing conflict

When Maetz Lebhar visited Ethiopia for a conference on dairy products in 2015, he did not expect to be calling the country his home within the space of a year.

Attracted by the market potential of products from his native Syria, including accessories to make shawarma, the 37 year old returned the following year hoping to find a local partner to help expand his business, perhaps in the form of opening a restaurant. It wasn’t long before the work trip turned into a permanent visit.

“I lost my extended family in the [Syrian] conflict and all our properties turned to ashes. I made Ethiopia my home as my circumstances changed in the blink of an eye”, he told The National.

“In Addis, I have been welcomed and I have managed to make my living selling the delicacies of my home.”

Mr Labhar works as a chef in a local restaurant and earns ETB30, 000 a month (USD 950) close to the annual average wage of $985.

Ethiopia currently hosts one of the largest refugee populations in the world, at over one million refugees, mostly from Eritrea, South Sudan, Somalia and Yemen. Now Syrians are joining their ranks, attracted by favourable asylum laws.

Read more »


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Fear of Economic Shock in Ethiopia

Abiy Ahmed Photographer: Eduardo Soteras/AFP/Getty Images

Bloomberg

Fear of Economic Shock Hampers Ethiopia’s Coronavirus Fight

By Antony Sguazzin and Samuel Gebre

Ethiopian Prime Minister Abiy Ahmed struck a deal with billionaire Jack Ma to distribute medical supplies across Africa and wrote an impassioned plea in the Financial Times for international aid to fight the coronavirus on the continent. Yet at home, he’s moved slowly.

The 43-year-old winner of the 2019 Nobel Peace prize postponed general elections due in August, closed schools and just a week ago declared a state of emergency. But crucially he has kept Ethiopia’s main airport open and allowed the national carrier to maintain flights, leaving the country vulnerable to new infections. Testing in Africa’s second-most populous nation has been paltry.

The contradiction between Abiy’s public concern about the pandemic and his reluctance to impose tight restrictions reveals deep-rooted fears about derailing his efforts to modernize the economy, said a government official familiar with his thinking. Evidence to support his concern is widespread in the rest of the world, where tough lockdowns have provoked economic contractions and mass unemployment.

“I don’t think this pandemic could have come at any worse time than this,” State Minister for Finance Eyob Tekalign Tolina said last week. “We cannot afford to leave a lasting shock on the economy because we have too much to lose.”

Read more »


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IMF: Global Economy Worst Since 1930s

An exterior view of the International Monetary Fund building, with the IMF logo, on March 27, 2020, in Washington. (Getty Images)

The Washington Post

The International Monetary Fund says the coronavirus pandemic is causing the worst economic downturn since the Great Depression of the 1930s.

In its annual world economic outlook, the IMF forecasts that the global economy will shrink by 3 percent this year before rebounding in 2021. Over the next two years, output will be $9 trillion less than expected before the crisis, according to Gita Gopinath, the fund’s chief economist.

The IMF says the U.S. economy will contract by 5.9 percent this year and grow by 4.7 percent next year.

“This makes the Great Lockdown the worst recession since the Great Depression and far worse than the global financial crisis,” said Gopinath.

Although the IMF expects a punishing global recession, the downturn will not be as severe as in the 1930s when the global economy shrank by an estimated 10 percent, she said.


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Ethio American Tech Company PhantomALERT Offers Free App to Track & Map COVID-19 in Real Time

The Ethio-American owned PhantomALERT, which was launched in 2007, says it has redesigned its application to be a dedicated coronavirus mapping, reporting and tracking application. (Courtesy image)

Tadias Magazine

By Tadias Staff

Updated: April 4th, 2020

Ethio-American Tech Company PhantomALERT Offers Free App to Track & Map COVID-19 Outbreak in Real Time

New York (TADIAS) — PhantomALERT, a Washington D.C.-based technology company announced, that it’s offering a free application service to track, report and map COVID-19 outbreak hotspots in real time.

In a recent letter to the DC government as well as the Ethiopian Embassy in the U.S. the Ethiopian-American owned business, which was launched in 2007, explained that over the past few days, they have redesigned their application to be “a dedicated coronavirus mapping, reporting and tracking application.” The letter to the Ethiopian Embassy, shared with Tadias, noted that PhantomALERT’s technology “will enable the Ethiopian government (and all other countries across the world) to locate symptomatic patients, provide medical assistance and alert communities of hotspots for the purpose of slowing down the spread of the Coronavirus.”

“The US Embassy facilitated communication with government agencies in Ethiopia and both the Health Minister as well as the Innovation and Technology Minister and others are reviewing our tech solution” Yoseph Seyoum, CEO of PhantomALERT, told Tadias. “I am pleasantly surprised to see that the Ethiopian Government is taking the COVID-19 threat very seriously and open to accepting and facilitating tech solutions.”

The mobile app uses GPS to “identify symptomatic patients, detect potential infection clusters and hotspots before they spread. It also includes the ability to contact, screen, assist and isolate symptomatic patients as well as report & share verified hotspots with media, authorities and communities to raise awareness, encourage social distancing and promote self-quarantining.”

Inevitably, the use of such technology to collect personal data raises the issues of privacy and security. “As a US-based company, we are very well aware of the sensitivity, controversy and possible misuse regarding collecting sensitive user-generated medical content,” Yoseph said. “However, in times of a global pandemic emergency, we believe patients, society, and governments should allow the collection of personal data as long as the user-generated content is opt-in.” He added: “Users are willingly reporting personal information. They are giving us permission to share data to save lives and contain COVID-19. PhantomALERT user-generated content regarding COVID-19 does not get published to the live map or made available to the general public until reviewed and approved by a moderator. Moderators have authorized government agencies and international agencies such as the Ministry of Health, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), and World Health Organization (WHO).“


Yoseph Seyoum, CEO of PhantomALERT. (Courtesy photo)

Yoseph also reiterated that the PhantomALERT platform, website, apps, and database are secured using industry-standard security protocols and software. “Data security and platform integrity is a priority at PhantomALERT,” Yoseph said.

Watch: New Coronavirus map, report & view hotspots in realtime by PhantomALERT

Watch: Demo PhantomALERT Coronavirus Reporting, Tracking, Mapping Android application CDC, WHO Presentation

Watch: PhantomALERT Public

You can learn more about PhantomALERT at phantomalert.com, iOS App and Android App.

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‘Your Safety is Our Priority’: How Ethiopian Airlines is Navigating Global Virus Crisis

Photo courtesy of Ethiopian Airlines. (@flyethiopian/Twitter)

Tadias Magazine

By Tadias Staff

Updated: April 3rd, 2020

New York (TADIAS) — Lately Ethiopian Airlines has been busy delivering much-needed medical supplies across Africa and emerging at the forefront of the continent’s fight against the coronavirus pandemic even as it has suspended most of its international passenger flights.

In March the airline flew to China and returned home fully loaded with medical supplies donated to Africa courtesy of the Jack Ma Foundation, which entrusted Ethiopia to distribute the material to the rest of the continent.

“Ethiopian Airlines, always true to its Pan-African creed, in good and bad times!” tweeted Henok Teferra Shawl, Ethiopia’s Ambassador to France, Spain, Portugal & Holy See – he is also a former Vice-President at the airline. “Covid-19: Ethiopian Airlines to carry medical shipments to be distributed to all African countries from Guangzhou to Addis Ababa.”

According to the Office of Prime Minister Abiy Ahmed the cargo included over one million testing kits, 6 million masks and 60,000 protective suits that Ethiopian Airlines has since rushed to Djibouti, Eritrea, Egypt, Sudan, Niger, Senegal, Benin, Gambia, and Burkina Faso among other nations.

“I am quite pleased to share that since receiving #COVID19 supplies from @JackMa and @AlibabaGroup a week ago, we have successfully finalized the distribution task within the continent in six days through our national pride @flyethiopian,” Prime Minister Abiy shared via Twitter last weekend.

Two Ethiopian Airlines Boeing planes were even spotted in Miami, Florida a few days ago transporting stranded crew members of cruise ships due to COVID-19 cases identified on board. An online report noted that “cruise lines have been chartering several planes out of Miami, including these two Ethiopian Airlines 777s.” “The final destination for these passengers [was] the Philippines. The Ethiopian Airlines flights, they operated from Miami to Addis Ababa to Manila.” The report added that both planes flew to Miami on March 30th from Washington and Chicago.

Ethiopian Airlines’ emergency medical supply run has also included some European stops such as Lisbon, Portugal where the country’s head of state expressed his gratitude in a recent social media post. “H.E Antonio Costa, Portuguese Prime Minister expressed his profound delight upon the Ethiopian aircraft unloading in Portugal thousands of personal COVID 19 protective equipment, suits and masks,” Ethiopian replied via Twitter: “Thank you your Excellency for your kind words.”

Meanwhile, in a letter to its customers Ethiopian Airlines emphasized that it’s woking with World Health Organization (WHO), the International Air Transport Association (IATA) and the Ethiopian Ministry of Health to assure employee and customer safety.

“We are regularly providing the highest standards of hygiene on all our aircrafts and terminals to make your travel experience seamless and safe,” the letter said. “We are making frequent disinfection of the work area, passenger terminal, cargo terminal, maintenance hangars, all airplanes on every departure and conducting regular measurement of body temperature of passengers and employees…All the time we are maintaining social distancing of employees and passengers specially when they line up to get some services.”

The letter stated:

In six days’ time, we have also delivered much needed testing kits, masks and other medical supplies to 51 African countries and some European countries. We are helping to save lives and this is one of the greatest intrinsic satisfaction in life for which we all are proud of.

We have made all of our aircrafts equipped with biohazard kits and we have gloves, hand sanitizer and face masks to keep our passengers and employees safe.

Our passengers whose travel date falls between 01 March- 30 June 2020 are eligible to re-book their tickets for travels until 31 December 2020 or opt to receive a voucher (credit note) for future travel which will be valid for one year from date of issuance.

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