‘Yes, Chef,’ a Memoir by Marcus Samuelsson

In his newly published Memoir, "Yes, Chef," Marcus Samuelsson recounts his remarkable story of how he became one of the few widely accepted top black chefs in the world. (Photo: marcussamuelsson.com)

The New York Times
By DWIGHT GARNER

‘Yes, Chef,’ a Memoir by Marcus Samuelsson

The universal rule of kitchen work, Marcus Samuelsson says in his crisp new memoir, “Yes, Chef,” goes as follows: “Stay invisible unless you’re going to shine.” That rule applies to writers too, especially to those who would write food memoirs. Because you like to put things in your mouth does not mean you have a story to tell.

Mr. Samuelsson, as it happens, possesses one of the great culinary stories of our time. It begins in Ethiopia, where he was born into poverty and where, at 2, he contracted tuberculosis, as did his mother and sister. The three of them trudged more than 75 miles in the terrible heat to a hospital in the capital city, Addis Ababa, where his mother died.

Read more at The New York Times.
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Related:
Samuelsson Memoir Traces Rise From Ethiopia to Obama (Bloomberg News)
Yes, Chef’ by Marcus Samuelsson (Boston Globe)


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